Jobs to be done – course notes

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3.a.-Forces-Diagram2.png

Job Story Equation.png

Getting the most of a job story interview

Dummy-ing up

I’m not sure what you are talking about, can you explain that to me?

 

Staying in the moment of the job timeline

When interviewing together: when the initial questioner is writing something down or has a pause to contemplate the next question – jump in and ask a question, but be sure it’s about the same moment in the timeline and adds to the context of the moment.

 

The Big Hire vs The Little Hire

The first purchase (use) and what the product is now being used for – the little hire (opportunities for innovation).

Opportunities for innovation

  • Where it was tried in a different (not usual) context and it worked
  • Where it was tried in a different (not usual) context and it did not work

 

Unlocking the memory

Slowing it down to set the scene. Asking adjoining details about the moment can help unlock the memory ie. Was it raining that day? did you have anyone else with you?

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THE JOBS-TO-BE-DONE MATTRESS INTERVIEW

http://jobstobedone.org/radio/the-mattress-interview-part-one/

Here’s a really interesting deep dive interview that a couple of guys from ‘Jobs to be done’ did with a random guy about his recent mattress purchasing experience. They ask questions largely around the history context and trigger points around deciding that a need was there – before exploring the point of purchase itself. It’s incredible how much background they get by gaining the context of thoughts, feelings and justifications for events that happened upto five years ago.

Podcast: Play in new window | Download

CLAY CHRISTENSEN ON JOBS-TO-BE-DONE & OPENTABLE

http://jobstobedone.org/radio/clay-christensen-on-jobs-to-be-done/

Podcast: Play in new window | Download

 

Please see the above links for the original article.

Clay: The Jobs to be Done framework is important to me because I need to
understand causality in my life. If I try to understand the world by
collecting data, the problem is that data is available only about the past.
It can measure the result but not the cause. If I have a company and I want
to know if people are going to buy my product, if I get information about
you- here I am, Clay, I turned 60 years old unfortunately, our youngest
child went to college unfortunately, and I live in the suburbs, I work at a
place like this, so these are all characteristics about myself. But, these
characteristics have not caused me to go out and buy the New York Times
today.

Bob: Right.

Clay: There might be a correlation between these characteristics and the
propensity to buy the New York Times, but it doesn’t cause me to do it.
What causes me to buy it, is the job, a job just arose in my life that I
need to get done, and I go out and I find something that will get the job
done, that’s the “causal mechanism”. In innovation, if I want to know that
customers are going to buy my product or not, I’ve got to understand the
job. That’s the unit of analysis.

people don’t want a quarter-inch drill, they want a
quarter-inch hole.

Open Table is a great example. There’s typically no shortage of attraction to
going out to eat. This is something that people want to do all the time.
But when you look at the anxiety with regards to ‘well first I have to make
plans with people’ like Clay says, ‘I have to make plans, and I;m going to
tell them all a specific time, and then I’ve got to hunt down a restaurant.
If the time doesn’t work, I’ve got to call everybody back’ that’s that
emotional energy that we always talk about where, nobody would explicitly
come out and tell you ‘yeah, I hate making reservations’ its just not
something that anyone would talk about. But, if you talk about the last
time people made reservations, you get enough stories where you could pull
out that energy.

30 MINUTES WITH RYAN SINGER ON JOBS-TO-BE-DONE

http://jobstobedone.org/radio/ryan-singer-jtbd-radio/

Show Notes & Links

Here is a list of items referenced in this episode: