Daniel Burka, on prototyping your way to massive influence

https://www.highresolution.design/7-daniel-burka/

Daniel Burka, High resolution, design sprints

 

In order for the design sprint to work – you need to know what problem to solve.

The outcome of a design sprint is to generate some ideas that will be shipped within the next 6 months – it’s not particularly useful for blue sky thinking

Measuring the success of a sprint

Did we get enough data to make a good decision & 6 months later when we shipped a product, did we get similar results?

Failure is when a good idea didn’t ship – did we not focus on the right areas, have the right people in the room

If we got 5 users in and they all said ‘x’ – what would we do? You need to be able to answer that question before you start a design sprint

To get buy-in – perhaps listen to stakeholders ideas, prototype it, then take it further (and make your idea). You can use the stakeholder’s prototype as a vehicle to show the benefits and downsides of the idea, then showcase how with just a few minor adjustments you could push their idea towards the right direction

Showcasing the outcomes of user testing a quick and dirty mockup is an easy way to prove the value of user testing and a quick way to validate the direction of the idea.

You’re prototyping to answer questions – not to win any design awards.

Designers have a great opportunity, to help companies make decisions faster. To become a core function. To elicit the CEO response ‘Of course I’m going to incorporate design – how else will I know where I’m going…’

 

http://www.gv.com/sprint/https://designsprintkit.withgoogle.com/

https://designsprintkit.withgoogle.com/